My root poem

Hi everyone,

I’m enjoying your root poems this month. Keep them coming! Here’s mine. It’s a villanelle, a 19-line poem made up of five three-line stanzas (tercet) followed by a concluding 4-line stanza (quatrain). There are only two rhymes in the poem. From the first stanza, lines one and three rhyme and are repeated alternatively as the third line in each of the following three-line stanzas. Both lines are used as a couplet to conclude the final stanza. These days the villanelle is often written in iambic pentameter. Another villanelle is coming up next month in Gregory K’s 30 Poets/30 Days event.

The Feisty Pig of France

The feisty pig of France is prone to root
In search of buried fungus called the truffle.
The problem is he likes to eat the loot.
Farmer tries to train the spry galoot
To snout the fungus out by sniff and snuffle.
The feisty pig of France is prone to root.
Farmer can’t control the greedy brute.
The pig will dig and fill a gallon duffel.
The problem is he likes to eat the loot.
When farmer yells, he doesn’t give a hoot.
He swings his derriere in a shuffle.
The feisty pig of France is prone to root.
Sometimes the farmer prods him with a boot,
But swine hide is much too tough to ruffle.
The problem is he likes to eat the loot.
The pig is much too valuable to shoot
And farmer knows he’d lose if they should scuffle.
The feisty pig of France is prone to root.
The problem is he likes to eat the loot.

— David L. Harrison

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