Writers at Work: Making On-line Writing Challenges Work for You, Part 2

IT IS WITH GREAT SADNESS THAT I TELL YOU THAT OUR FRIEND BARBARA ROBINSON JUST PASSED AWAY. THANKS TO ALL WHO SENT SUPPORT AND LOVE DURING HER LAST FEW WEEKS. SHE WILL BE MISSED SO VERY MUCH.

Hi everyone,
David publicity photo
WRITERS AT WORK
Making On-line Writing Challenges Work for You
Part 2
David
Tuesday, July 9, 2013

Well, dear Sandy, dear Sandy, I’m glad you asked how on-line challenges work from the point of view of the challenger. So far I haven’t been much of one to accept challenges but boy can I dish ‘em out.

My challenge-tossing habit began in 2009 when I became sole owner of a brand-new blog thanks to the devilishly clever Kathy Temean who, upon finishing the nifty website she’d created for me, said that I had to have a blog and, in spite of my manly protestations, proceeded to make me one anyway.

After some stuttering starts, I settled into the routine of searching for material to post. I didn’t want to talk about what I had for breakfast, as utterly fascinating as that might be. Besides, some mornings I skip breakfast so where would that leave me? I began to think about worthwhile content that would justify the time of anyone who happened by my speck of space.

One of my favorite exercises is to take a word – any word will do just fine – and see where it takes me. I’m hardly alone in doing this. What reminded me of it at the time was something I’d just heard Billy Collins say when he lectured in Springfield. One of his poems, “Hippos on Holiday,” sprang from those three words. First came the title, then the poem inspired by the thought.

I issued my first challenge, which I called, WORD OF THE MONTH POETRY CHALLENGE, in October 2009. It has continued each month since then. Again enlisting Kathy Temean’s help I created one category for adults and two for students (grades 3-7 and 8-12). Each month a number of poets, some in other countries, think about the word until a connection occurs that starts them off writing a poem. Long ago I stopped tracking how many poets, poems, and countries have been represented on WORD OF THE MONTH during the forty-five months since it began. Maybe one thousand poems? I get contributors from United States, Canada, U.K., Italy, Australia, Philippines, South Africa, Germany, France, Sri Lanka, India, Malaysia, New Zealand, and many others. I always accept my own challenge so I’ve now written forty-five poems for WORD OF THE MONTH.

The challenge hasn’t been as successful with students although we’ve attracted quite a few. Partly it’s a matter of time. Rules call for teachers to select up to three poems per month per class to post. But if a teacher is into a nonfiction unit or bearing down on math or preparing for testing or a million other things, spending time with young poets has to slip down the list of priorities.

Over the years I’ve thrown down the old gauntlet a few other times too. Now and then I’ll respond to some spontaneous urge. A year ago the lake behind our house was “turning.” Scum from the bottom was rising to the top as the weather changed and caused the semi-annual cycle. I moaned on my blog about my ugly lake and issued a plea for help in couplets. They came in serious numbers from poets who seized the moment to dash off a bit of sarcasm or encouragement.

Linking up with my friend and partner in two books (bugs and Vacation), I occasionally prevail upon Rob Shepperson to provide one of his wonderfully witty drawings, which I post with a challenge to caption it. The idea is borrowed from the weekly contest on the last page of the New Yorker. I see it as a way to exercise a different writer’s muscle and many of my visitors apparently do too.

On several occasions I’ve enjoyed posting challenges issued by others. J. Patrick Lewis has come on my blog with such interesting challenges that poets leap into the game. Steven Withrow suggested a challenge. So have Joy Acey, Jeanne Poland, and others. I’m happy to act as host when these opportunities come along.

Sandy, for some reason the challenges I’ve issued so far have all involved poetry. I think I know why. There are many good bloggers who keep writers challenged with writing novels, picture books, creating story ideas, and so on. I also know of some who challenge their visitors to write poetry. Laura Purdie Salas posts a picture on Fridays and asks poets to write something in fifteen words. But poetry keeps me amused so I tend to stick with it.

My most recent addition, May 2013, is something called THEME OF THE MONTH POETRY CHALLENGE. The twist here is to help writers focus on one basic theme, very much like they’d probably need to do if working with an editor in hopes of being published. For this one I asked visitors to suggest themes and I got a lot. The first one I selected was fishing. For June, the theme was food. This month it’s relatives.

Sandy, I think I’ll wait for my second act to talk about the responses I get from those who accept my blog challenges. By then maybe I’ll have some new comments from participants that I can pass along. So for now, back to you!

David

7 comments on “Writers at Work: Making On-line Writing Challenges Work for You, Part 2

  1. David,

    You have exceeded all expectations when you took the blog challenge. What a quick learner. I am very proud of you and all the tech things you have learned in such a short time. I wish others could take a page from your book.

    Kathy

  2. I don’t have time to participate in many online challenges (though I do try to keep up with Laura Salas’ Thursday 15-words-or-less exercise), but when I do, I come here first! I still haven’t plunged into WOM, but I’ll get there!

    Thanks for all you do to keep us on our poetic toes, David. You are a national treasure and a good egg!

    • Thank you, dear Renee. You’re very kind. I’m always delighted when you visit my blog. One of these days that old WOM is going to catch you!

  3. I don’t remember when I first discovered your blog, David, but I’m certainly happy that I did. I love the challenges and the group of people who generally participate. They’re good writers and I’ve learned just by reading your work (books too, of course) and the new ones crafted by the commenters. It also feels low-key enough that I don’t get too nervous about sharing. I’m glad the powers that be ordered you to do the blog! You’ve made it a pleasure to visit!

    • Thank you very much, Linda. Not everyone who comes here leaves comments so I don’t know who they are, but those who do have created a little warm spot in space that makes me proud.

  4. Kathy
    Why do you use a baby picture?
    David
    Only 2009!
    Feels like forever.
    Your blog begot my blog.
    Photographers stepped in, with video makers.
    Now I’m media girl lovin’ it!
    Jeanne

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