Still seeking research stories

Hi everyone,

Sandy Asher and I are still gathering anecdotes from published writers and artists about the lengths they’ve gone to in their search for authenticity in their work. We’ll include as many as we can in the 4th installment of “The Search for Authenticity,” an upcoming series of WRITERS AT WORK. To accommodate our own workloads we’ve tentatively set April as the month to post the four segments on successive Tuesdays (7, 14, 21, 28), beginning with Debbie Dadey and followed by me, then Sandy, and finally the conclusion with stories shared by our readers.

Please send your thoughts directly to me so we don’t spoil the surprise before the post goes up on Tuesday, April 28. You can use my e-mail: davidlharrison1@att.net. We’ve heard from Bill Anderson, Jane Yolen, Veda Boyd Jones, and others but still have plenty of room for more.

These don’t need to be long, just enough to set up the situation and explain how you researched to prepare for what you were going to write. Most of the entrees will probably range from a few words to 200 or so. Thank you in advance.

Advertisements

9 comments on “Still seeking research stories

  1. I am probably an outlier, but I intend to do travel research BEFORE I know I am doing the book. In other words, something in that travel gives me an idea. So I’d already been to the Desert Museum, a rain forest, in several swamps, and Alaska before I had the idea for the four picture books WELCOME TO. . ., etc. And I found the idea for the historical novel on Mary Queen of Scots when I was visiting Stirling Castle because there was a placard that said “Mary Queen of Scots had three female jesters.” I already had a lot of information about Mary because I have a house in Scotland. I simply collected more books on castle architecture and brochures about medieval kitchens etc. I have a huge research library in both Massachusetts and Scotland and access to five major research libraries: Smith College (am an alum and live in the area), UMass (ditto), Amherst College and Mt Holyoke (not an alum but live nearby, and St Andrews University a ten minute walk from my Scottish home where as the wife of an late professor I have research rights.

    Jane

    • Jane, thanks. At times it’s hard to distinguish between getting ready for a story and being ready for a story. Either way the gathering of facts and impressions is a vital part of the process. It’s good to be reminded of this.

    • Well it’s not like I’ve forgotten your request for a tiger story, Jeff! Tiger stories simply take longer than most stories, several decades longer. I’m working on it! How about, “There once was a tiger with a little toy drum?”

    • . . . a monkey singing in a tree.
      “It’s a mighty fine day,” sang the monkey.
      “I’ll come too.”
      Rum pum pum went the drum.
      Rrrrrrr went the tiger.
      “It’s a mighty fine day,” sang the monkey.
      And they went along and went along and went along the road.
      And soon they met . . .

  2. a rhinoceros, eating grass.
    Rum pum pum went the drum.
    Rrrrrrr went the tiger.
    “It’s a mighty fine day,” sang the monkey.
    “It’s might fine grass,” groused the rhinoceros.
    “But mayabe I’ll come, too.”
    And they went along and went along and went along the road.
    And soon they met . .

    • . . . a little boy working in a garden.
      “Please tell me a story,” begged the boy.
      “I’ll tell you a story,” said the tiger,
      “But first you have to come with us.”
      “Then I’ll come, too,” said the boy.
      Rum pum pum went the drum.
      Rrrrrrr went the tiger.
      “It’s a mighty fine day,” sang the monkey.
      “It’s mighty fine grass,” groused the rhinoceros.
      “Please tell me a story,” begged the boy.
      And they went along and went along and went along the road.
      And soon they met . . .

  3. Pingback: From blog to book covers | Children's Author David L. Harrison's Blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s