Waterford event has two days remaining

Hi everyone,

A reminder that Waterford Crystal’s first ever virtual signing event will end in two days. Orders taken by early on March 2 can still be accepted.

Store number: (417) 881-7555
Home number: (417) 881-0084
Cell number (Sandy): (417) 830-5634
https://gamblesgifts.bridgecatalog.com

GAMBLE’S GIFTS in the Brentwood Center is one of four sites in the United States selected to host a first of its kind event — a virtual Waterford signing. Two of the others are in Chicago, one is in New York City.

Ten preselected pieces of crystal created by Waterford Crystal in Waterford, Ireland are now on display at Gamble’s Gifts as well as on the store’s website. From February 15 through March 1 anyone interested in acquiring one or more of these crystal collector’s items and having them signed can qualify for the signing event by placing their orders through the store.

Orders will be forwarded to Tom Brennan, Waterford Crystal Spokesperson & Master Artisan, who will fly from Ireland to New York to sign each piece. Signed pieces will then be shipped to Gamble’s for customer pickup or drop-shipped directly to anyone who lives outside the Springfield area.

Sandy Harrison says this is a unique example of using today’s technology to bring people exquisite treasures from one of the oldest and most revered crystal houses in history. For centuries Waterford creations have graced homes and castles alike with a wide range of creations including chandeliers, stemware, trophies, lamps, dinnerware, bowls, and numerous other lines of keepsakes that have been handed down from one generation to the next.

Each year in Times Square, an estimated 100 million people in the United States and one billion viewers worldwide watch the Waterford ball descend to mark the beginning of the New Year. One of the largest crystal masterpieces ever made, the ball weighs 11,875 pounds, is twelve feet in diameter, and is adorned with 2,688 crystals.

Harrison says, “No matter where you live, you can now own a signed piece of Waterford thanks to this first ever virtual signing event. It’s like owning a little piece of history.”

WRITERS AT WORK: Rule 1: Show Up, Part 4

Today’s post was prerecorded.

Hi everyone,

Thanks for following us this month during the 4-part segment of WRITERS AT WORK: Rule 1: Show Up. Here’s Part 4, the final offering. Sandy Asher, back to you, and as always it has been a pleasure to partner with you again! Also, a reminder that at the conclusion of each of these chats, I gather them up, send them to Sandy, and she adds them to the entire series at http://usawrites4kids.blogspot.com

WRITERS AT WORK
Rule 1: Show Up
Part 4: Sandy

I can’t tell you, David, how many times I’ve tried to make “showing up” work for me without reaching my intended goal. I network. I meet editors and directors. We talk about projects we might take on together. We may even assure one another that these projects are exciting and have enormous potential. Yes! Yes? No. We part company. Time passes. Aaaaand . . . nothing. Sometimes it feels like being the kid who can’t get anyone to dance with her at a party. Everybody else is dancing (or so it seems from my forlorn perspective). What am I doing wrong? Am I trying too hard? Am I not trying hard enough?

Invitations to dance often seem to come out of the blue, out of left field, out of who-knows-where? Someplace I am simply not looking.

Still, I have to show up to receive them.

Case #1: I served on a panel at an American Alliance for Theatre and Education (AATE) conference. I also attended other presentations and spoke up during the discussion periods afterward. No agenda, just voicing opinions, sharing what I’d learned that seemed applicable to the topic at hand. Then a director I’d never met approached me and asked me to join her for coffee. Of course, I accepted. “I think you’re someone I’d like to work with,” she said, basing her conclusion on my comments in the sessions she’d attended earlier in the day. I never knew she was in those rooms or listening to me, but coffee led to a commission to adapt “Little Women” for her youth theater, and that led to a visit to Lancaster, PA, which soon became my home. Who knew? Who could possibly have known? But I was there, actively there, and the future found me.

Case #2: I attended the opening reception of a new art gallery in town and was stunned by the images on the walls and the journal entries that accompanied them. I approached the gallery owner, who was an acquaintance, and suggested the story conveyed by the exhibit deserved a wider audience. Might I read the journals and think about writing a play? Permission was granted, and the result became both a stage and film version of “Death Valley: A Love Story.” I did not walk into the gallery intending any of that. It was waiting there for me to show up.

Case #3: My interest in TVY (Theatre for the Very Young) led me to the first meeting of AATE’s special interest group dedicated to that topic. Which led to a conference call among members, during which someone bemoaned the fact that American TVY practitioners almost never get to see one another’s work. In Scotland and Denmark, we’d heard, practitioners are able to visit one another’s theatres and learn and grow together. We’re separated by too much geography and too little affordable transportation. That casual phone comment gave me an idea: What about a digital festival? Fast forward: I gathered a steering committee, wrote a grant proposal, got the grant, and American Theatre for the Very Young: A Digital Festival debuted on Vimeo on March 1, 2018, with a first offering of 11 performances from around the country, including Pollyanna Theatre’s production of my play based my own picture book, CHICKEN STORY TIME, and more to come.

Case #4: The Dramatists Guild announced the formation of an Institute that would offer various courses for playwrights. I sent the director (whom I’d never met) an email stating my hope that courses for playwrights working in theatre for young audiences would be included and pointing out that our field is not often given the attention it deserves. The director assured me such a course was under consideration and invited me to come in and to talk about it. I did. And guess what? I’ll be teaching a “Weekend Warrior” course in writing plays for young audiences at the Guild offices in New York City on April 4 – 6, 2018.

A panel, a reception, a conference call, an email — all ways to show up. And sometimes to join in the dance.