WRITERS AT WORK: Rule 1: Show Up, Part 2

Hi everyone,

Here is Sandy Asher with Part 2 of this month’s issue of WRITERS AT WORK: Rule 1: Show Up. Thanks, Sandy. The floor is yours.

WRITERS AT WORK
Rule 1: Show Up
Part 2: Sandy

All kinds of ways to show up, David, and, yes, I’ve managed more than a few: I attend, present at, and often develop workshops and conferences. I do programs at bookstores, libraries, and festivals. I submit work to contests and publishers. I visit schools occasionally as a guest author and weekly as the nearly invisible human being at the other end of Gracie the Reading Dog’s leash. I adjudicate contests. I started and maintained for years the American Alliance for Theatre and Education’s Directory of Award-winning Plays and its New Plays by Members List. I speak up at professional meetings and in discussions even when I’m not on the panel. And, on March 1 of this year, I helped launch American Theatre for the Very Young: A Digital Festival as founder and co-chair, showcasing children’s plays coast-to-coast, including my own. Oh, yeah, and you and I have done reading-focused TV spots, David, and we ran the America Writes for Kids and USA Plays for Kids websites together. Oh, and we co-write this blog.

Though it doesn’t always lead to publication, all of this showing up is related to career development, even being the largely ignored observer as first graders regale Gracie with their favorite books. Some of it is hard work; much of it is undeniably great fun. And every once in a while, it does lead to new ideas, a flurry of writing, and publication.

More often than not, such opportunities happen in ways that are totally unexpected, ways I could never even have imagined. “Life,” John Lennon is said to have observed, “is what happens while we’re busy making other plans.” Indeed.

One example: While serving on the faculty of an SCBWI workshop some years ago, I was sitting in the audience with the other participants listening to editors talk about what they were looking for. It’s always a good idea to show up at SCBWI workshops and listen to editors, agents, authors, and illustrators, but in this case, what one of the editors had to say really ticked me off. She raved on about how picture books used to run 1000-1500 words in length, but how nowadays 500 words is really the preferred limit, and 250 words would be even better.

That triggered a concern of mine: I think we are systematically depriving children of language at the very age — 0 – 5 or so — when they are programmed to soak up as much language as possible. They need it to think! They need it to speak! They need it to understand! They need it to read and write and reason! I could go on. I have gone on, in presentations and posts elsewhere. But for now, I’ll just say that there was steam coming out of my ears as I listened. But I decided to use my fury as fuel. Okay, fine, I thought, you want books with very few words? I’ll write a book with as few words as I can. With that impetus — can I call it inspiration? — CHICKEN STORY TIME happened, a process of elimination almost as much as it was a process of creation. The manuscript sold quickly, the book got published, and, since then, I’ve written a stage adaptation that’s being performed around the country. Go figure!

Showing up is important, but it can be a bit of a challenge. Rising to the challenge — ah, that makes all the difference.

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4 comments on “WRITERS AT WORK: Rule 1: Show Up, Part 2

    • My fault, Bryn. I’m sorry for the confusion. This month I posted a picture of my office before I cleaned up the clutter, and I suggested that everyone should be free to choose a word that came to mind and let it be the inspiration for this month’s poems. I failed to remind everyone of it or change the page from January to February. so everyone can choose his or her own word. Apologies!

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