Bring it on

Hi everyone,

This promises to be a good week. Jane Yolen and I are into a new book so I’ll work on that. Wyatt Townley (former Kansas Poet Laureate) and I are thinking through the possibility of doing something together so I’ll work on that. Mary Jo Fresch and I are into the final tweaks before our book goes to the printer so I’ll work on that.

SONY DSC

I need to provide manuscripts and other information to my agent so I’ll work on that. And I hope to get a yes from an editor who wants a manuscript I have with her. It will be a busy week with lots of work and few interruptions. I’m buckling in.

David

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From blog to book covers

Hi everyone,

Two years and six months ago I posted something called Still seeking research stories. Here’s the link: https://davidlharrison.wordpress.com/2015/01/28/still-seeking-research-stories/#comment-25320 . Jane Yolen’s response triggered a long standing request from my son Jeff Harrison that I write a story about a tiger for him. He was probably under ten when he asked me. So I responded with an opening line and Jane added a first page, and I added, and she added, etc.

At some point Jane and I went offline to talk about the book we’d just started and we went from there to finish it. Yesterday we learned that we’re about to receive an offer to publish the story as a picture book. What great fun. And it all started here.

Telling the past

Hi everyone,

Yesterday Jane Yolen and I finished a new collection of poems and sent it on its way. During the day we got to talking about the Scottish brogue and that brought back memories of when I was a child in Ajo, Arizona. My dad worked in the payroll department for Phelps Dodge Mining Corporation and one of his associates was a Scott named Harry Poole. The two couples got together from time to time and that was fine with me. I was six or so and I loved to listen to that man talk. He had grown up in the old country and could tell story after story about what it was like when he was a young man. When Mr. Poole retired, he and his wife moved to California. I only saw him one time after that, when we took a trip that way and stopped in for a visit. Their retirement bungalow was cozy with a small living room and kitchen. I don’t remember the bedroom. There was a white crocheted doily draped across the back of the brown sofa. Mr. Poole sat in his favorite chair beside the sofa. This is what I remember.

After the greetings and everyone was settled, Mr. Poole tamped fresh tobacco into his pipe, lighted it, took a few trial puffs, then looked off into the past while my dad and I waited. We were about to be treated to another of Mr. Poole’s stories. I could hear the women in the kitchen, catching up over tea. Mr. Poole said, “When I was a boy, twelve, thirteen, my father sent me to work at a saw mill. The family needed the extra money. A puff or two. The mill was a dangerous place. Lots of noise. No safety features. Accidents were commonplace.” I don’t remember if my dad was smoking a cigar but he was awake so he probably was. Mr. Poole went on, “One day a lad got careless and ran a log too close to the blade. Took his finger off.” The old man’s eyes began to smile. “The lad wrapped a rag around the stump,” he said, “then he slipped up behind the fellow at the next saw and dropped his finger down the back of his coveralls. You should have seen that lad carrying on when he eventually fished the finger out and saw what it was!” I don’t remember if I laughed or gasped. Mr. Poole obviously thought it was a funny story. He closed his eyes as if fact checking. Satisfied, he nodded, opened his eyes, and went to his pipe again, leaving a comfortable silence to drift around the room.

How accurate is this memory? I like to think it’s close to the way it happened. Whether it is or not, who is to say? It’s my memory and has lived in my mind as clearly as a video for nearly seventy-five years. Telling the past is an important part of what writers do.

Baiting up

Hi everyone,

Productive day yesterday. I finished the sixth poem for a new proposal that’s now ready to send out, and also finished the sixth poem for a proposal with Jane Yolen. That will be two more hooks in the water. Never know what you might snag!

Wheel, part 2

Hi everyone,

Jane, I couldn’t get back yesterday. Here’s my follow-up to your poem. Thanks for the prompt.

Back in my wheel,
my book-lined nest.
Inhaling the silence,
I cherish the test.

Here I take nourishment,
live in my head.
Here I imagine
the sorcerer’s thread.

Words are my fortress
where safely within
I trundle my wheel,
I spin, I spin.

(c) David L. Harrison