Blasts from the past

Hi everyone,

It was a long week but a good one, as long as I don’t count losing all those books from print. I think I’ll amuse myself — and hopefully you — by posting a few excerpts from books are will be no more. Here are the two opening pages from EARTHQUAKES: EARTH’S MIGHTIEST MOMENTS; Boyds Mills Press, 2004. The dedication read: In Memory of John Harrison.

(Settlers in rustic cabins rousted by violent earthquake.)

In 1811, at two in the morning
just nine days before Christmas,
settlers in New Madrid, Missouri
all woke at once.
Their furniture was bouncing,
pots and pans flying.
Cabins shook.
Chimneys tumbled.
Roofs fell in.

(Outside ground is splitting, streams flowing into cracks, tree trunks flying.)

Outside was worse.
Trees snapped in two.
The ground rolled.
Here and there it cracked open,
swallowed streams,
and squirted muddy water.
People hundreds of miles away
felt the shocks.
At that time it was
the worst earthquake
in our country’s history.