Birds of a feather

Hi everyone,

It’s cold and food is getting scarce. Many birds are moving restlessly around the neighborhood, feeding in groups. There are suddenly robins in abundance. Juncos too. I don’t know if any of the birds are headed south but some might become part of larger flocks that fly as far as Mexico to find more agreeable weather for the winter. They’re fun to watch but these cold days I do most of my watching through the windows. I wrote a poem about the birds this time of year for THE PURCHASE OF SMALL SECRETS, published in the 1990s’.

Bright-Eyed Good-byes

Birds
busily
tidying up
the season

Shouting
bright-eyed
good-byes

Joining
choosing sides
forming teams

Arguing
plans

Debating
from treetops

Everyone
talking
at once

Swirling
down
to the lawns
like black leaves

Pecking
for snacks

Gusting
skyward

Diving
wheeling
practicing

Days 
of false
starts

Where
is the leader?

Who
is in charge?

When
was the signal?

I
missed the vote
same as always

They’re gone!

(c) 1998 David L Harrison, all rights reserved

Here at Goose Lake

Hi everyone,

We’ve had several days of wind and rain. Lots to watch around Goose Lake. Plenty to write about. Here’s one.

The Wave

Windy day at Goose Lake.
Restless ground clutter under siege
by missiles of twigs and leaves.
A small yellow butterfly bucks the wind,
fails, turns, goes with the current.
At the end of a limb slender as a whip,
the only leaf left waves wildly.

Waving at something? Me? Not likely.
But out of gratitude for a summer well done,
I raise my fingers slightly, 
It’s only a leaf.
It cannot know it might have waved at me,
or that I, at my window,
might have waved back.

© 2022 David L. Harrison 

A Goose Lake morning

Hi everyone,

Yesterday morning I looked out a kitchen window to our back yard and at the solitary figure of our once majestic maple tree. It now stands bare, stripped of its limbs, enduring the slow, public ignominy of losing its remaining bark. Rotting pieces lie around its base, adding a somber setting to the process. One day before long the trunk will stand like a statue to its former self and will be beautiful again. Not yet though. I look at it often and wish it good speed.

Yesterday morning I saw something different around the old tree, two things. One, the sun pointed out a spider web glistening from a brick pillar toward some distant anchor point.

Two, a dandelion stood among the shards of decaying bark at the base of the tree. And those observations were related. The dead tree, the dandelion, and the spider were all part of the same picture. You can’t see it because of my inadequate effort to shoot through glass, but one end of a web strand is attached to a dandelion stem! Imagine how much else we don’t know about the world around us.

I love Goose Lake. My coffee never tasted better.

Wishing you a Goose Lake kind of weekend

Hi everyone,

Turned out to be a good week for staying on target. It’s a nice feeling to head into the weekend that way.

As for the weekend, weather is turning cooler, leaves are blowing off the hackberries and maple and cherry trees, mostly into the pool. Time to winterize and cover. I’ve sighed about this before.

Hope you have a good weekend. Check out the new Word of the Month, officially posted by JEANNE POLAND tomorrow but sneak previewed yesterday. It’s a biggie.

All caught up

Hi everyone,

I got in some sneak-writing yesterday and it made up for the slow week. All turned out according to schedule so I’m a happy guy.

On a sadder note, it’s time to have the pool covered. Leaves are blowing in faster than we can scoop them out. How I miss the time of year when there’s so much life and spontaneity around the water. I’m already dreaming about next spring.

Enjoy the day. Pay no attention to the old grump at Goose Lake.