A good day to end on

Hi everyone,

Yesterday I won! The recalcitrant poem finally tired of teasing me and allowed me to steer it to a rather satisfactory conclusion. I borrowed one of Jane Yolen’s happy dances for that!

It was also a good day because Mary Jo Fresch and I concluded our manuscript for the new NCTE book and she clicked the 190-page manuscript on its way. This one began casually with an idea from Mary Jo on August 3, 2017. “I got an idea the other day…a book of nyms. Here is what I thought…I would give the explanation of the nym (antonyms are words that have opposite meaning, blah blah, blah), give examples (hot/cold; fast/slow, etc.), and a suggested lesson. You, of course, would use some in a poem. They are in the standards across the grades. Doable?” I, of course, said yes. This makes our 7th book together. So now, 889 e-mails and a handful of Skype sessions later, we’re ready to see what our editor makes of it. Next step is that the manuscript will be sent out to professionals in the field to gather their responses. We’ve already gone through this process once, in the beginning, before a contract was offered based on an extensive proposal.

And finally, I got a lovely note from a teacher/editor in France about the new book for ESL students. Here’s her message. I don’t think Melanie Herment will mind.

Dear David,
I want to thank you so much for inspiring our students with your poem. I am a teacher and author of textbooks in France, and we have once again used your wonderful ‘”It’s me” poem in a book for ESL students: In Full Swing 2nd (Ed. Didier, as always 😉 I have used your poem in class and the students loved it. We talked about art and the process of inspiration, which is why I asked them to make their own diptych and poem, and to record the poem. You can discover some of their productions here (if you’re interested): https://bit.ly/2JqLKPn ; https://bit.ly/2vDM9Wo and on the Facebook page of our collection: https://www.facebook.com/infullswingeditionsdidier/
Thank you so mcuh 🙂
Melanie

Good day? I think so! And today we pack and leave this lovely place on the gulf to return home after an absence of twenty-five days. I’ll admit to some goo foffing along the way — and it has all been lovely — but a little work has gotten done as well.

My Word of the Month poem

Hi everyone,

Here’s my Word of the Month poem inspired by our word: ZONE. I hope to see a lot more poems before the end of the month. So far we have eight thanks to Cory Corrado, Jeanne Poland, Bryn Strudwick, Jane Yolen, William Joe Pyles, Robert Schechler, Elizabeth Neubauer,, and Jane Heitman Healy.

The Road

Together down the road we go.
Where we’re going we don’t know.
Most prefer it nice and slow.
Some are in a hurry though.

Those who like a slower gait
Have no sense of running late.
If now and then they pause to wait,
The fun of getting there is great.

For others slowpokes make them groan.
Winning is all they’ve ever known.
To get there fast and first, alone,
They live inside the passing zone.

Together down the road we go.
Where we’re going we don’t know.
Most prefer it nice and slow.
Some are in a hurry though.

(c) 2019 David L. Harrison
all rights reserved

I’m in a new book

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT: It’s time for a summer blog party over at Matt’s house. Look for more information tomorrow and start getting ready to join the fun. Here’s his link if you don’t already have it handy. https://mattforrest.wordpress.com Thanks to Matt for hosting his second party. Who will be the next host/hostess? It isn’t too early to volunteer!

Hi everyone,

I neglected to mention that Monday was the official publication date CHILDREN’S LITERATURE IN THE READING PROGRAM, 5th Edition. I’ve told you about it before but now it’s official and I’m very happy to have my chapter on poetry included, pages 182-200. Here’s the blurb.

“This indispensable teacher resource and course text, now revised and updated, addresses the “whats,” “whys,” and “how-tos” of incorporating outstanding children’s literature into the K–8 reading program. A strong emphasis on diverse literature is woven throughout the fifth edition, with chapters emphasizing the need for books that reflect their readers and presenting dozens of carefully reviewed books that teachers will be eager to use in the classroom. Leading authorities provide advice on selecting texts, building core literacy and literary skills, supporting struggling readers, and maximizing engagement. The volume offers proven strategies for teaching specific genres and formats, such as fiction, nonfiction, picturebooks, graphic novels, biographies, and poetry. This title is a copublication with the International Literacy Association.”

This is the third straight edition for which I’ve been invited to write the chapter about poetry. In this one I’m grateful to Charles Ghigna, Jane Yolen, Kenn Nesbitt, Cheryl Harness, Steven Withrow, J. Patrick Lewis, and Joyce Sidman for contributing poems. Their collective genius does wonders for the chapter! Not only that, Sylvia Vardell and Janet Wong have a special insert that adds even more spark and great information so I’m thankful to them too!

This one was a long time coming. I feel like celebrating!

Word of the Month update

Hi everyone,

For some reason the word for May — MOUSE — isn’t resonating with many of you. Through this morning we’ve had only five poems, counting mine, posted all month.

Interestingly, of the four other poets, Cory Corrado, Jeanne Poland, Bryn Strudwick, and Jane Yolen, three countries are represented, four if you count the time Jane spends in Scotland. Also, Susan Hutchens posted a mouse poem that I overlooked earlier.

Have I missed anyone? Sing out if you posted on a regular post rather than on Adult “W.O.M.” Poems because I might have missed you. Otherwise, let’s see more mouse-inspired poems, people! Squeak up!