Pleasant surprises in the library

Hi everyone,

The other day when we visited Jennifer’s new school, Sato Elementary School, one of my favorite rooms was the library. One — it’s a beautiful, airy room, and two — the first book I spotted was Sandy Asher’s title, CHICKEN STORY TIME and shortly after that I saw one of my own, JOHNNY APPLESEED, MY STORY. I LOVE those folks at Sato!

A new production of SOMEBODY CATCH MY HOMEWORK

Hi everyone,

Sandy Asher has learned that SOMEBODY CATCH MY HOMEWORK, the play she wrote in 2002 based on my poems and published by Dramatic Publishing, shows a production of the play scheduled at the LDS church in Provo, Utah on August 3.

I don’t know how many times the play has been produced but quite a few, including at least once in Europe. Sandy might know. SOMEBODY CATCH MY HOMEWORK made its world premier in Springfield where I sat in the audience and glowed (or at least felt like it) when characters from my poems came to life on stage and, at appropriate times, recited various poems from my books. It’s like a musical but I’d call it a poetical.

Lunch with the Ashers

Hi everyone,

You all know Sandy Asher or know about her plays, novels, poetry, and educational books. She and I bring you the WRTITERS AT WORK series and we’ve worked together on several other projects including her play based on my work called SOMEBODY CATCH MY HOMEWORK and a book we wrote together called JESSE AND GRACE (with a editor now). Earlier we did an anthology for boys called DUDE! We’ve also presented together numerous times, especially in the days when we created a live program that featured books for young people to encourage a joy for reading.

Sandy and Harvey lived in Springfield while raising their family. Harvey taught history at Drury and Sandy was Drury’s Writer in Residence. They moved to Pennsylvania so we rarely see one another these days. That’s why it’s such a pleasure that they’re in town regarding Sandy’s work and we’re getting together for lunch today.

A surprise from last year

Hi everyone,

Sandy Asher just shared her discovery that SOMEBODY CATCH MY HOMEWORK was produced last year in Edinburgh, Scotland. Here’s an excerpt from the article.

“Victor J. Andrew High School Presents: Somebody Catch My Homework!

Theatre students of Victor J. Andrew High School will be putting on a fun, high energy production on Thursday, July 27th that they will also be presenting just a few days later at the 2017 Edinburgh Fringe Festival in Edinburgh, Scotland! The show is titled “Somebody Catch My Homework” and follows the everyday lives of fourth graders. Unlike a traditional musical, where the actors would break into song, in this production, they will break into poetry. Alex Craig, a student involved in the production said “We were looking to do something a little different for our show”. This family friendly, children’s show will be the only one they do before they bring it to Scotland.”

Sandy’s play, published by Dramatic Publishing, was first performed in Springfield, Missouri in 2002. She chose characters and poems from my work to pull together a class of 4th graders. I don’t know how many times the play has been produced now, but it has been several. This isn’t the first time it has appeared in another country.

Sandy, thanks for finding this and sharing it. Yay for SOMEBODY CATCH MY HOMEWORK!

WRITERS AT WORK: Rule 1: Show Up, Part 4

Today’s post was prerecorded.

Hi everyone,

Thanks for following us this month during the 4-part segment of WRITERS AT WORK: Rule 1: Show Up. Here’s Part 4, the final offering. Sandy Asher, back to you, and as always it has been a pleasure to partner with you again! Also, a reminder that at the conclusion of each of these chats, I gather them up, send them to Sandy, and she adds them to the entire series at http://usawrites4kids.blogspot.com

WRITERS AT WORK
Rule 1: Show Up
Part 4: Sandy

I can’t tell you, David, how many times I’ve tried to make “showing up” work for me without reaching my intended goal. I network. I meet editors and directors. We talk about projects we might take on together. We may even assure one another that these projects are exciting and have enormous potential. Yes! Yes? No. We part company. Time passes. Aaaaand . . . nothing. Sometimes it feels like being the kid who can’t get anyone to dance with her at a party. Everybody else is dancing (or so it seems from my forlorn perspective). What am I doing wrong? Am I trying too hard? Am I not trying hard enough?

Invitations to dance often seem to come out of the blue, out of left field, out of who-knows-where? Someplace I am simply not looking.

Still, I have to show up to receive them.

Case #1: I served on a panel at an American Alliance for Theatre and Education (AATE) conference. I also attended other presentations and spoke up during the discussion periods afterward. No agenda, just voicing opinions, sharing what I’d learned that seemed applicable to the topic at hand. Then a director I’d never met approached me and asked me to join her for coffee. Of course, I accepted. “I think you’re someone I’d like to work with,” she said, basing her conclusion on my comments in the sessions she’d attended earlier in the day. I never knew she was in those rooms or listening to me, but coffee led to a commission to adapt “Little Women” for her youth theater, and that led to a visit to Lancaster, PA, which soon became my home. Who knew? Who could possibly have known? But I was there, actively there, and the future found me.

Case #2: I attended the opening reception of a new art gallery in town and was stunned by the images on the walls and the journal entries that accompanied them. I approached the gallery owner, who was an acquaintance, and suggested the story conveyed by the exhibit deserved a wider audience. Might I read the journals and think about writing a play? Permission was granted, and the result became both a stage and film version of “Death Valley: A Love Story.” I did not walk into the gallery intending any of that. It was waiting there for me to show up.

Case #3: My interest in TVY (Theatre for the Very Young) led me to the first meeting of AATE’s special interest group dedicated to that topic. Which led to a conference call among members, during which someone bemoaned the fact that American TVY practitioners almost never get to see one another’s work. In Scotland and Denmark, we’d heard, practitioners are able to visit one another’s theatres and learn and grow together. We’re separated by too much geography and too little affordable transportation. That casual phone comment gave me an idea: What about a digital festival? Fast forward: I gathered a steering committee, wrote a grant proposal, got the grant, and American Theatre for the Very Young: A Digital Festival debuted on Vimeo on March 1, 2018, with a first offering of 11 performances from around the country, including Pollyanna Theatre’s production of my play based my own picture book, CHICKEN STORY TIME, and more to come.

Case #4: The Dramatists Guild announced the formation of an Institute that would offer various courses for playwrights. I sent the director (whom I’d never met) an email stating my hope that courses for playwrights working in theatre for young audiences would be included and pointing out that our field is not often given the attention it deserves. The director assured me such a course was under consideration and invited me to come in and to talk about it. I did. And guess what? I’ll be teaching a “Weekend Warrior” course in writing plays for young audiences at the Guild offices in New York City on April 4 – 6, 2018.

A panel, a reception, a conference call, an email — all ways to show up. And sometimes to join in the dance.