And my new agent is . . .

Hi everyone,

Now I can tell you that James McGowan at BookEnds Literary Agency is my new agent, and I am delighted. BookEnds is listed among America’s top literary agencies and James has a lot of successes to show for his hard and insightful work on behalf of his clients. I’m excited to be working with him!

As part of the introduction as a new client of the agency, I was asked to respond to several questions that are being published on the BookEnds site today at 10:00 a.m. EST. Here’s the link if you’re interested. http://bookendsliterary.com/ Look for my picture and click on “comment.”

A new gift from a fading page

Hi everyone,

Here as promised is my Word of the Month Poetry Challenge poem.

Gift from an Old Journal

My mother spotted it,
partly obscured by
green grass beside the walk,
brought it to me
still violet blue in death.
“You probably have a lot of these.”

Thrilled the way I used to be
by magic capes and decoding rings,
hardly believing my good fortune,
I cradled the fragile wisp in my hand —
the new star of my collection.

Gazing now at the careful entry,
the fragile page in my first journal —
my 12-year-old self,
my mother,
the rare blue butterfly —
gather to me once more for a joyful moment.

(c) 2019 David L. Harrison, all rights reserved

Sharing LET’S GO TRUCKS

Hi everyone,

I recently showed you this picture of Marshall, who is three years old and likes a book I wrote in 1973. It was his father Paul’s favorite book when he was a little boy too. Paul sent his son’s picture and said “Whenever I or my parents see a tow truck being towed, we cheerfully say, ‘Tow trucks tow tow trucks.’ We also tend to mention “crafty criminals and crooks” whenever we see an armored truck.”

Paul grew up to become a technical writer. His mother Nancy smilingly says she’s sure that all those times she read to her son when he was a little boy had something to do with it. She sent me the book so I could sign it and send it back to Marshall. It isn’t often I get to hold a copy of a book that has been shared by two generations. I asked Sandy to take my picture before it went out in today’s mail on its way back to Marshall in California.

The search is over

Hi everyone,

I’m delighted to say that yesterday I made my choice and signed with a new agent. We have a follow-up call set for Thursday so I’m going to wait to make the official announcement and tell you who it is after that. For now, I have a lot of new forms to complete.

Thanks again to everyone who helped me choose the new picture for my website. The winner is me on the sofa with my arms folded. I’ve asked Kathy Temean to make the change. I very much appreciated all your sweet comments along with your preferences. Wow!

Yesterday I finished (and sent off to my new agent) a new collection of poems. It’s different from anything I’ve done or have seen in the market and I’m pleased with it.

Today I think I’ll fill out forms and, if time permits, get back to revising the middle grade novel I’ve been working on over the past three years.

I don’t know when I’m going to get to some of the other ideas in my head. I still need to finish the book with Laura Robb but we’re waiting for word from our editor before I go ahead with that one. And Mary Jo Fresch and I continue to wait to hear from the editor for our project.

Thinking about my sister

Hi everyone,

Today would have been Jule Lynn (Harrison) Egleston’s 67th birthday. She died April 17, 2018 of pancreatic cancer. Here’s the last picture I have of us together. It was taken at my birthday party last year, barely more than a month before she died.

When my sweet sister was a little girl, her bedroom was next to mine. She played her two favorite records endlessly: “Yipes, Yipes, I’ve Lost My Yellow Stripes!” and “Yah, Yah, Your Carrots Won’t Come Up.” They used to drive me nuts. Now I would give anything to hear them again, if she was the one playing them.

The first children’s story I sold, the one that paid me $5.07, was titled, “Jule Learns to Ride.” I think she liked it when I chose to use her name as my heroine.

Rest well, little sister. I love you always.